Instructor Resources

Instructor Resources, Lesson Plans, and Assignments

Module Guides

These are roadmaps through the weekly assignments. They provide an overview of the required assignments expected of students, including a description of the course purpose & objective, how it works, class requirements & policies, the application of the material, key questions & answers, and important resources & dates. The remaining modules contain the bulk of the coursework. In addition, each module guide offers summaries of the chapter and weekly assignment.

Full List available upon request.

Intro to Philosophy: Aesthetics, Dualism, Ethical Theory, Illusion of Free Will, Origins of Western Philosophy, Philosophy of Horror, Philosophy of Religion, Problem of Evil, Rationalism & Empiricism, Theory of Forms

Critical Thinking: Skill of Analysis, Evaluation, Induction, Deduction, Grouping, Synthesis, Abstracts, and Persuasive Essays

Intro to Humanities: Primary Sources, Abrahamic Religions, Africa, Fin De Siécle, Greeks & Romans, Humanists, Middle Ages, Romantics, Age of Reason, Modernity & Surrealism.

Course Orientation Module Guide. Each course begins with a Welcome Module Guidebook. This guide contains EVERYTHING the student needs to complete the course, i.e policies, instructions, deadlines, assignments rubrics 

Critical Thinking. Students learned how to read and analyze primary sources in the form of art and text. Students defined analytical terms followed by a practical activity using these new skills. At the end of the week, students submitted a writing response, no more than five-paragraphs long, detailing an assessment of the primary source.


Sample Syllabus

The list below are samples of previous Syllabus's used throughout my course.

Introduction to Humanities

Introduction to Humanities: 20th Century

Critical Thinking

Introduction to Western Philosophy

Lectures

This is a small sample size of the various Philosophical lectures within the course. 
Full List available upon request.

Aesthetics, Dualism, Ethical Theory, Illusion of Free Will, Origins of Western Philosophy, Philosophy of Horror, Philosophy of Religion, Problem of Evil, Rationalism & Empiricism, Theory of Forms


Ethical Theory. Ethical theory is the branch of philosophy explaining the justification for your actions according to your particular societies' norms. The philosophical study of Act-oriented and Character-oriented approaches to how a person ought to live and act.

Origins of Western Philosophy. Philosophy seeks to gain awareness between the similarities and the differences amongst ideologies, not the right and wrong ideologies. Philosophy seeks to understand the ideas of our society, then after much contemplation, we discuss possible answers and see what the stems from the advantages and challenges of that discourse. The Presocratics shifted speculation away from the ideals of the supernatural to the natural realm of reality and knowledge as it appeared in the natural world.

Dualism. The senses, instinct, and knowledge are said to exist in the mind. However, some philosophers argue the mind is nothing more than a material organ. Dualism and Materialism explore these questions with thought experiments designed to answer, just where is the mind, what is it, and do we survive death? 


Lesson Plans

An organized instructor projects authority, knowledge, and trust showing the students their instructor knows what they're doing. These lessons plans are the ideal timetable to keep the instructor on task and 'tangent-free' which. let's face it, staying on topic in a classroom setting tends to go awry depending on where the conversation takes you. But, this is a step in the right direction. 

Full List available upon request.

Lesson Plans; Ethics & Civil Disobedience, Free Will, Logical Fallacies, Plato's Forms, Dualism, Primary Sources, Abrahamic Religions, Africa, Fin De Siécle, Greeks & Romans, Humanists, Middle Ages, Romantics, Age of Reason, Modernity & Surrealism. 

Lecture related games: Ethics: The Box (make your choice), The Trolley Problem, & Minute Debates, Question Cards, 

Age of Reason. Students finished their course by reviewing where we have been and where we are now -- basically summing up the entire 19th and 20th century - no easy task!

Minute Ethical Cards. How well are you at thinking on your feet in a reasonable logical manner? That's the task of this Ethical Icebreaker game!